Thinking Skills in Reading Activities

It’s no surprise that some of the most useful reading skills are also some of the most difficult for kids to master.  Skills like making inferences, characterization, and making use of text structures take practice.  Kids gradually become proficient at these deeper thinking skills by putting them to use.  One good way to practice is by starting with short practice texts, such as on task cards, and then putting the skills to use on longer texts such as short stories, novels, and non-fiction articles.  This involves plenty of close reading.

 

Task cards are a great place to start because they are so versatile.  They can be used in a variety of ways, and kids can complete more or less cards according to their individual needs.  Also, specific cards can always be selected to review a skill needed by one kid or a small group.  Here are some task cards from my Teachers Pay Teachers store that address these more complex reading skills.

 

Context Clues task cards -Expedition, from Classroom in the MIddle

 

Inference Task Cards - Thinking Caps, from Classroom in the Middle

 

Characterization Kids Task Cards, from Classroom in the Middle

 

 

Close reading  really requires kids to think, and it also requires them to focus.  Going through a full close reading lesson step by step shows students how to tackle a text in depth.   Close reading works great with a non-fiction text that relates to a topic students are studying in one of their content-area classes.

 

So far, I have two close reading resources in the store, with more to come for back-to-school.  Both of these are about elections, and the first one is a FREEBIE.

 

Close Reading - women's suffrage, from Classroom in the Middle

 

 

Close reading - elections, four articles with everything needed for a full close-reading  of each

 

 

Finally, novel studies are a great way for students to put the thinking skills that they are acquiring to good use.  Novel study questions and assignments  that focus on making inferences, characterization, and finding clues in the text require students to think and interact with the reading, not just recall information or answer from their own ideas.  By supporting their answers with details or quotes from the text, students can see for themselves, and prove to their teacher, that their answers are correct.

 

So far, I have completed novel studies, focusing on the areas discussed above, for these three novels:  The Cay, Number the Stars, and CRASH.  More to come.

 

Number the Stars novel study, focusing on characterization, inferences, and using context clues

 

The Cay Novel Study, focusing on characterization, inferences, and context clues

 

Crash novel study, focusing on characterization, context clues, and making inferences

 

 

There is also a FREEBIE for each of these novel studies:

 

Crash Coogan's Yearbook - FREE

 

Number the Stars Plot Diagram Freebie

 

The Cay - Characterization Timeline - Free

 

 

 

Linked with Comprehension Connection for the Summer Blog Party and with Teaching Blog Addict for Freebie FRiday:

 

Teaching Blog Addict Freebie Downloads

 

 

 

 


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